May 16, 2016 will mark the centenary of the signing of the Sykes-Picot agreement. The agreement was based on the premise that the Triple Agreement took place during the First World War and aimed at other objectives in the defeat of the Ottoman Empire and was part of a series of secret agreements that reflected on its partition. The first negotiations that led to the agreement took place between 23 November 1915 and 3 January 1916, during which British and French diplomats Mark Sykes and Fran├žois Georges-Picot signed an agreed memorandum. [3] The agreement was ratified by their respective governments on 9 and 16 May 1916. [4] The agreement was first directly used as the basis for the Anglo-French modus vivendi of 1918, which provided a framework for the Occupied Enemy Territory Administration in the Levant. More generally, it was to lead indirectly to the subsequent partition of the Ottoman Empire after the Ottoman defeat of 1918. Shortly after the war, French Palestine and Mosul ceded to the British. Warrants in the Levant and Mesopotamia were awarded at the San Remo conference in April 1920, according to the Sykes-Picot framework; The British mandate for Palestine ran until 1948, the British mandate for Mesopotamia was to be replaced by a similar treaty with compulsory Iraq, and the French mandate for Syria and Lebanon lasted until 1946. The anatolic parts of the agreement were attributed by the Treaty of Sevres of August 1920; But these ambitions were thwarted by the Turkish War of Independence of 1919-23 and the Subsequent Treaty of Lausanne. In the Middle East, few men are pilloried these days, as much as Sir Mark Sykes and Fran├žois Georges-Picot. Sykes, a British diplomat, travelled on the same lawn as T. E. Lawrence (of Arabia), served in the Buren War, inherited a Baronetcy and won a Conservative seat in Parliament.

He died young, at the age of 39, during the flu epidemic of 1919. Picot was a French lawyer and diplomat who led a long but opaque life until his death in 1950, mainly in Backwater-Posten. But the two men continue to live in the secret agreement they were to devise during the First World War to divide the vast land mass of the Ottoman Empire into British and French spheres of influence.