The 599-page withdrawal agreement covers the following key areas:[16] A government document published in the Sun on February 12 indicated that eight agreements (including Canada, South Korea and the EEA countries) had “skidded” until March 29. Other agreements, notably with the Andean Community, Mexico, Ukraine, the North African countries and the Western Balkans, have “significantly slipped”, while stating that an agreement with Algeria, Turkey, Japan and Moldova would not be possible until 29 March. On 22 October, the British Parliament agreed to review the Brexit Act. But she decided it took longer than the British Prime Minister had proposed. This means that it is no longer possible to withdraw with an agreement on the planned date of Brexit, 31 October. The Brexit deal will not come into force until the Brexit law is passed by the British Parliament. The new relationship between the EU and the UK begins, provided an agreement has been reached, approved by the EU Member States, the European Parliament and the British Parliament. The government issued a technical opinion on existing trade agreements in the absence of an agreement in October 2018. If there were no replacement agreements on the withdrawal date, the terms of the World Trade Organization (WTO) would apply to the most favoured nation (MFN), with all WTO members having to have the same tariffs applied in the absence of a free trade agreement.

This is the third time the British Parliament has rejected the agreement. The UK has until 12 April 2019 to decide how to proceed: the most important elements of the draft agreement are:[21] The agreement covers issues such as money, citizens` rights, border agreements and dispute settlement. It also includes a transition period and an overview of the future relationship between the UK and the EU. It was published on 14 November 2018 and was the result of the Brexit negotiations. The agreement was approved by the heads of state and government of the other 27 EU countries[9] and by the British government led by Prime Minister Theresa May, but it faced opposition from the British Parliament, which needed approval for ratification. The approval of the European Parliament would also have been necessary. On January 15, 2019, the House of Commons rejected the withdrawal agreement by 432 votes to 202. [10] The House of Commons again rejected the agreement by 391 votes to 242 on 12 March 2019 and rejected it a third time, on 29 March 2019, by 344 votes to 286.

On 22 October 2019, the revised withdrawal agreement negotiated by Boris Johnson`s government approved the first phase in Parliament, but Johnson halted the legislative process when the accelerated approval programme failed to receive the necessary support and announced his intention to declare a general election. [12] On 23 January 2020, Parliament ratified the agreement by adopting the withdrawal agreement; On 29 January 2020, the European Parliament approved the withdrawal agreement.